My Favorite Research

There’s a scientific study I learned about last year in preparation for Dr. Joe Dispenza’s meditation retreat:

The science of tickling: why the brain won’t let us tickle ourselves


The key part I learned is that knowing where I will be tickled prevents the tickling because there’s no surprise. Despite the unbearable laughter that comes from tickling, the surprise is an essential element to it. Similarly, we can apply this to prayer.


When we pray we ask for something, but there’s is an important distinction to be made. Prayer is not wishing or wanting; prayer is aligning oneself and one’s actions with that which they’re praying for. The person has to become the prayer. Not knowing when the prayer will show up is a necessary element to prayer. While a person can choose what to pray for, she cannot know how or when it will materialize. Becoming the prayer means living as if that which is prayed for is here now in the person’s life.


Like with tickling, if you knew when your prayer were to arrive, there’d be no surprise. So, let G-d tickle you with the surprise of when your prayer will manifest. Just be open, and live without looking for the prayer much like an artist would create without looking for his creation. The artist is one with the art, he’s not looking for it which implies separation.


As Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish new year, the birthday of the world, begins this coming Monday night (September 6, 2021), it is an auspicious time to pray in the way of aligning with the highest visions of ourselves. Imagine the greatest expression of your life and what that looks like. Then, finish your prayers as if they are already answered.


Cheers to a sweet New Year! 🍎 🍯


Favorite Quote


Their beginning is wedged in their end - Sefer Yetzira (Book of Creation) 1:7
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